In the Lab with Eric Martinez: What Causes Hip Pain

Hip pain is one of the worst pain anyone can have and is complicated to alleviate. When it comes to hip pain, there are a lot of reasons and moving parts that can cause pain, such as:

  • A large amount of range of motion
    • Can be heavily comprisable due to a loss of range of motion or increase of range of motion which can cause pain.
  • The hips are one of the most weight-bearing joints of the body
    • Pain can come from overuse.
  • Many of our muscles are connected to the femur and pelvis
    • Multiple muscles mean a higher case of causing over-compensation in one area, which can lead to pain or overuse.
  • Biomechanical relationship to the knee and back
    • I call it the “dumb joint,” because if there’s a knee problem, then there’s a hip problem.
    • If there’s a back problem, then there will most likely be a hip problem too.
  • Other neurological related issues
    • Nerve impingement
    • Scars running the facial nerve matrix
    • Past traumas

There are a lot of things that can go wrong and cause pain. The best course of action is to narrow down the cause of pain first and then to continue working with the patient until the pain has subsided. Once they have a strong foundation to fall on and prevent any further issues, is when I would recommend starting a new program aimed at the patient’s goals. 

Until next time,

Eric Martinez, Co-Founder and Clinical Performance Specialist

Infinity Sports Institute

163 NE 24th St Miami, FL 33137

Monday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Tuesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Wednesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Thursday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Friday
6:00 AM – 6:00 PM
Saturday
12:00 AM – 8:00 PM
Sunday
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How to Make time for Exercise

“I just don’t have any time to work out, I’m always too busy,” is something we all will end up telling ourselves at some point. I get it, life comes at us fast and we are constantly juggling our responsibilities and emergencies as they pop up and the next thing we know it’s time for dinner and bed.

 It’s hard enough to make time for the important things, let alone exercising consistently. Well, I’m here to deliver a bit of hard truth, your health is easily just as important as any of the other responsibilities we have. 

However, as with all things, there’s light at the end of the tunnel (as they say). The good news is that your fitness routine does not have to take hours and it doesn’t even have to be every day. The goal for your health is to take action that you can sustain. Even if it’s a 20 min walk in the morning before work. You don’t have to go to the gym, learn a bunch of new exercises or create a complicated routine, simple effective activity will do just fine to start. 

A morning walk a couple of times a week, sprinkled in with some time to stretch, or maybe adding some push-ups and sit-ups will have you on the path to a healthier lifestyle! The beauty is the more time you invest in your health, the more time you’ll end up finding for it. So let’s keep it simple and just start. Remember the journey of a thousand miles starts with a single step!

Until next time,

Written by Cody Perez – Performance Specialist

Infinity Sports Institute

163 NE 24th St Miami, FL 33137

Monday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Tuesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Wednesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Thursday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Friday
6:00 AM – 6:00 PM
Saturday
8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Sunday
Closed

In the Lab with Eric Martinez: Training Clients who have Cardiovascular Diseases

Many cardiovascular diseases are manageable in the sense that we can monitor and modulate the intensity of an activity as the individual gets stronger. 

The key importance to working with cardiac disease is as follows:

1) Are there any other conditions such as pulmonary, shortness of breath, diabetes, swelling, hypertension, claudication, neuropathy, pacemakers, or neurological concerns?

2) What medication are they using, if any? 

3) Are there signs of chest pain, dizziness, pain, and numbness in extremities?

4) Be aware of the Cardiologist’s recommendations. 

5) Know the disease and its limitations of it.

6) Check blood pressure several times during activity.

7) Time vs intensity is key to a successful program.

8) Using many forms of measurements for intensity is important, Rpe, Mets, Hr, Blood pressure, and even breathing rate.

Activity and dosage are key. I start by having my clients do simple tasks that they can achieve and be consistent with. Over time I’ll add additional tasks, for example, I’ll begin with 5-minute intervals and slowly progress by adding more time as they improve.

During their rest periods, I’ll check their Avo2 saturation, blood pressure, HR, ask how they feel, and look for signs of heavy breathing. For more in-depth training on this subject feel free to reach out to us and ask about our Clinical performance Specialist course.

Until next time,

Eric Martinez, Co-Founder and Clinical Performance Specialist

Infinity Sports Institute

163 NE 24th St Miami, FL 33137

Monday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Tuesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Wednesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Thursday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Friday
6:00 AM – 6:00 PM
Saturday
8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Sunday
Closed

Weight Loss vs. Fat Loss

There’s this common trend that when most people start their fitness journey, they focus specifically on losing weight – with an emphasis on solely performing cardiovascular training. While they have the right intentions, there’s more to weight loss than just cardio!

Many of us end up gaining weight over the years when our responsibilities take center stage, and unfortunately, our health takes the back seat. What I want to express to my clients is that while our intentions are in the right place, the focus should not be primarily on weight loss – their focus should be fat loss. Through this approach, we can monitor something more specific and not let the scale dictate our success. Now that you have established that fat loss is the focus, we can narrow the vision down and pinpoint the best way to drop our body fat percentage.

The best way to increase our metabolism and drop body fat is to focus on increasing our muscle mass. Yes, ladies you too should focus on resistance training and increasing your muscle mass as the most efficient way to drop fat and lean out, cardio is not the friend you think it is. While cardio is great for your cardiovascular health it is not the go-to method here. 

Resistance training is great for building muscle and increasing our resting metabolic rate which is where we will have the biggest impact on losing fat. This will increase your metabolism and help you drop that body fat percentage much more effectively than hours on the treadmill. So, don’t fear the weights and get out there and build some muscle. Trust me, you’ll be glad you did!

Until next time,

Written by Cody Perez – Performance Specialist

Infinity Sports Institute

163 NE 24th St Miami, FL 33137

Monday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Tuesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Wednesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Thursday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Friday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Saturday
8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Sunday
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In the Lab with Eric Martinez: Why Understanding your Client is Key to their Performance

Understanding that everything is a journey and conveying that to the client is key to a successful rehab or to improve performance. We sometimes forget that everyone’s experience is different from our own. 

A 6-week program is doable for professionals who dedicate time in their daily schedule to complete a 6-week program. However, a 6-week program for an individual who has never experienced such a thing (to be in pain and not getting the instant gratification of a healed injury) can make it seem like a lifetime. 

This Paradox continues to grow as we get bombarded by media and other factors that influence the client/patient mindset. From what I’ve learned, understanding our patients and utilizing our education is key to achieving the proper outcome. 

When we understand that people learn at a different pace and/or by different forms, it helps the process. You could have done everything imaginable and there is a chance that it doesn’t work. Take that moment to review what might have been missed, like giving homework via video of sheets or maybe even referring them to another professional. As a professional, you have a right to guide clients until they either outgrow your teachings and/or everything else was done to achieve their goals.

Until next time,

Eric Martinez, Co-Founder and Clinical Performance Specialist

Monday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Tuesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Wednesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Thursday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Friday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Saturday
8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Sunday
Closed

Caffeine: How Much SHOULD we be Consuming?

Coffee, the most consumed product on the planet. When that morning cup of coffee hits me in the morning it seems like I’m ready to tackle the day. What is it about that cup of joe that just seems to be the key to start the engine off our morning? Most people view coffee (caffeine) as a necessary part of our routine and without it everything seems off. I want to dispel some myths about caffeine and how it works and just how much we should be taking in a day. 

Caffeine is a stimulant, which means it increases activity in your brain and nervous system. It also increases the circulation of chemicals such as cortisol and adrenaline in the body.  Caffeine is well absorbed by the body and typically within 5-15 minutes you can start feeling the effects. Most research will show that up to 400mg of caffeine daily is sufficient for us and anymore can lead to the jitters, dehydration, headaches, and anxiety.

What most people don’t know is that caffeine isn’t giving you energy but tricking the mind into thinking that it isn’t tired by blocking the receptors from adenosine, a hormone that causes sleepiness. This is one of the main reasons we experience the 2 PM drop in energy. Now I’m not here to advocate against the morning coffee but understanding what it does will help us understand why our bodies are crashing in the early afternoon. That morning cup just might be a crucial part of your day but let’s be careful with just how much we are taking in so we can avoid the harmful side effects. 

Until next time!

Written by Cody Perez – Performance Specialist

Infinity Sports Institute

163 NE 24th St Miami, FL 33137

Monday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Tuesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Wednesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Thursday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Friday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Saturday
8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Sunday
Closed

In The Lab with Eric Martinez: How to Determine Your Cardio Training Program

“What’s the best cardio training program?” This is such a loaded question, the best form of cardio-based on our experience and practice is some form of interval training. I define interval training as going a little higher on the heart rate for a few seconds and then back down – it does not mean moving to the maximal effort. 

Cardio should be based on multiple factors. If I were to work with a high-risk patient then the interval would be based upon the restriction and rate of perceived exertion. Take a person with a pacemaker for example. If the pacemaker is set at 120 (beats per minute) max, then my intervals would be 90 BPM on the low end and 110-115 BPM at the high end. This of course is also related to the education and inherent risk the practitioner is willing to take.

On the flip side with athletes with no risk factors, I would want to push them to their maximal heart rate and see where their Lactate Threshold (LT) of Ventilatory Threshold (VT) markers are at as well as the metabolic point of aerobic and anaerobic shift. 

If the maximal BPM is 202 in a 30yr old and the VT is 176 BPM, the metabolic point is 155 BPM. My intervals would then be based on the activity or the preferred adaptations. 

For better adaptation from homeosis, we need to decide to either improve power, speed, endurance, or recovery of anaerobic effort.

For anaerobic recovery I would do 3:0.5 ratio intervals = 155 BPM for 3 min then 30 sec at 170 BPM (just under VT) – followed by slowly REDUCING the recovery period.

If it’s an endurance athlete looking to increase speed then I would select a 3:1 ratio following the same format but slowly ADDING more time when they’re at their higher heart rate; leaning towards anaerobic capacity at 3:1.5 ratio and onwards. 

The reason for this logic is that at a homeosis state the human body needs to adapt. The more conditioned you are, the more we need to push your body to see the full benefits of, increased Heart Rate Reserve, AVO2, Capillary Density, Mitochondria Density (and size), better cardiac output, higher blood plasma…the list goes on. 

For beginners ideally, we don’t need to push them too hard, however, we want to introduce a more challenging anaerobic capacity later in their training to obtain the best benefits. 

Until next time, 
Eric Martinez, Co-Founder and Clinical Performance Specialist

Monday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Tuesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Wednesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Thursday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Friday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Saturday
8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Sunday
Closed

How to Create a New Healthy Habit

So you find yourself wanting to start living a healthier lifestyle. You have goals in mind and you even created a timeline to help you get there. Great!! Now we need to figure out how we are going to instill these habits into your daily life and make them sustainable so they can hopefully become your new norm. This will more than likely become the hardest part of starting that journey. 

The good news is I have some tips to help you create those healthier habits. With all-new habits, it comes down to putting them into small actionable steps so we can eventually ramp it up to the habit we want. Let’s take working out regularly, for example, we may want to be able to workout 5 days a week (let’s say for an hour a day) but in reality, a 0-100 method not only becomes a daunting task but also sets us up for failure. 

What’s important to focus on is where we currently stand and what we can reasonably do now. Work, family, and school all take up a large portion of our day, and before you know it the day is gone. 

Let’s start with 15-20 min a day 2-3 days a week as a starting point. This amount invested won’t be too demanding of our schedule and can help build the foundation of getting out there and doing something even if it isn’t exactly what you had in mind. This method not only helps kick-start the habit but makes it sustainable so we can build off that for the future. The plan is to create small victories that lead us to the overall goal. Small steps in the right direction will still lead us to our destination.

Until next time!

Written by Cody Perez – Performance Specialist

Infinity Sports Institute

163 NE 24th St Miami, FL 33137

Monday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Tuesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Wednesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Thursday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Friday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Saturday
8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Sunday
Closed

In The Lab with Eric Martinez: How to Strengthen your Weak Muscles

Can a muscle be short in length and weak? The answer is yes. The muscle is always going to be based on the constant task that is accomplished over again and again. After some time, our body will start to neglect specific muscles, thus shortening and weakening those muscles.

Why does this matter? Sometimes we feel aches, tightness, weakness, and imbalances in our bodies. The listed symptoms are typically the culprit of short and weakened muscles. To fix this, it’s important to lengthen and strengthen the muscles through new ranges of motions that people may resist. 

Let’s look at IT band syndrome, patella femoral syndrome, and runner’s knee for example. These can all be related to short glute muscles, short tensor fasciae latae (TFL), weak quads, strong quads, strong popliteus, etc., you get the idea.

No matter what muscle/muscle groups are causing you pain, the easiest thing to do is to increase the strength of ALL HIP MUSCLES. You can achieve this by introducing new ranges of motion such as isometric holds of the affected muscle in a new position and by holding the isometric holds for a longer period of time. 

Below are some example exercises you can try: 

1) 90-90 Degree Pose – holding isometric contractions.

2) Split Squats – in various angles such as the Bulgarian Split Squat, Knees Over Toes, and the Lean Back Stance.

Remember to go slow when introducing a new movement and do not rush! 

Until next time, 
Eric Martinez, Co-Founder and Clinical Performance Specialist

Monday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Tuesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Wednesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Thursday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Friday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Saturday
8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Sunday
Closed

How Much Protein Should I be Eating?

We have all undoubtedly been given all sorts of information about protein. The most conflicting issue seems to be how much protein to take. All this information swirling around can make things very confusing and even overwhelm us. Well, I’m here to help you with information overload. In short, protein is required for the growth and maintenance of tissues. Your body’s needs are dependent on your health, daily lifestyle, and activity levels. So how do we know how much protein we need? On average the human body needs about .8 grams per kg of body weight. For example, a person weighing 175 pounds (175 / 2.2 = 79kg) would need about 64g of protein a day to maintain their current weight. This is contrary to most information out there which typically uses pounds instead of kilograms as the unit to measure against.

Most information out there will tell you to eat more protein to gain muscle but that is only a half-truth. That big steak you just had isn’t going to increase your muscle mass. While adequate protein is needed for growth, you can’t build muscle without the exercise to go with it. The body can’t store protein so once the current needs are met any extra protein is stored as fat. So how much protein should I eat if I want to increase my muscle mass? Those who exercise regularly will have higher needs, about 1.1 to 1.5g per kg. This will keep you at a growth level without putting you into excess calorie intake which would lead to extra stored fat. Excess protein (especially beef) can also have negative effects on your cholesterol and lipid numbers. Although I’ve provided you with some insight on this vast and over consuming topic, you should always consult with your doctor or registered dietician to help determine your appropriate daily goals.

Written by Cody Perez – Performance Specialist

Infinity Sports Institute

163 NE 24th St Miami, FL 33137

Monday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Tuesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Wednesday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Thursday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Friday
6:00 AM – 9:00 PM
Saturday
8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Sunday
Closed